Ghanaians Prepare to Vote in Election with Familiar Front-Runners

Dec 04, 2020

Ghanaians go to the polls Monday with incumbent President Nana Akufo-Addo and former president John Mahama as front-runners.

Akufo-Addo’s party has campaigned mainly on his education initiatives, while Mahama’s has focused on job creation and attacking his opponent's record on corruption. But the familiar faces have also made voter apathy an issue.

Ghana's government this week announced Monday, Dec 7, would be a public holiday - to help get voters to the polls to choose the next president.  

Despite more than 17 million registered voters and 12 presidential candidates, authorities are battling voter apathy with familiar front-runners from the last two elections.   

Incumbent President Nana Akufo-Addo of the New Patriotic Party (NPP) is facing off against his predecessor, John Mahama of the opposition National Democratic Congress’ (NDC).

Mahama won in the 2012 election and then lost to Akufo-Addo in the 2016 election.   

Journalist Al-Smith says, despite his efforts to raise awareness of COVID-19's effects, it has been a struggle to get Ghanaians to take the virus seriously, especially as the election has taken center stage 
Off

Kojo Asante, with the Ghana Center for Democratic Development, says there is fatigue, mainly among the middle classes.

"The first few hours is always a good indicator of whether people will eventually go out," said Asante. "If they see the crowds are behaving and then they get feedback that it is very easy to go and vote and so, then they might eventually still go out, even if they had decided not to."

Despite the challenge, Asante says their pre-election survey shows Ghanaians are concerned about issues such as improving infrastructure and employment.

The survey pointed to positive responses on the ruling NPP’s handling of COVID-19, power supplies, and education. 

But the public was less impressed with Akufo-Addo’s record on inflation, inequality, and corruption. Attacking Akufo-Addo on corruption was a focus of Mahama’s campaign, along with job creation. But risk consulting group Songhai Advisory’s Kobi Annan says both men have underperformed in office. 
 
"It's a difficult choice for a lot of people. Neither of them have performed fantastically during their terms of office, and I think it will come down to primarily sentiments around things like education, corruption, job creation. I think job creation and education in particular - those affect more people day-to-day than corruption does," said Annan.

Under Mahama’s presidency, there was an energy crisis, corruption scandals and a currency devaluation.  

In 2016, the NPP won by about one million votes and with high expectations for Akufo-Addo to stamp out corruption.

But in the weeks leading up to this year’s election, the opposition NDC made corruption allegations against Akufo-Addo.  Ghana’s anti-corruption special prosecutor resigned just three weeks before the election, alleging political interference.   

While Akufo-Addo denies any corruption in his administration, analysts say it’s hard to know if the claims will impact the vote.   

Regardless of the result, or voter turnout, analysts are expecting Ghana’s election to be fair and peaceful – as with the last two elections.  

Maame Gyekye-Jandoh is head of the University of Ghana’s Political Science Department.

"Emotions may run high, but based on these past precedents, these past good precedents, I believe that the election will be peaceful, and the results will be considered credible and legitimate," said Gyekye-Jandoh.
 
The University of Ghana published a voter survey that gave the NPP an estimated 11% lead over the NDC with five percent of voters undecided.

 

Culled from VOA

  1. Opinions and Analysis

Calender

« May 2021 »
Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat Sun
          1 2
3 4 5 6 7 8 9
10 11 12 13 14 15 16
17 18 19 20 21 22 23
24 25 26 27 28 29 30
31