The problem of irregular migration from the East and Horn of Africa to southern Africa presents a formidable challenge for countries along this route.

As they device ways of managing the flows while at the same time ensuring that the human rights of migrants are respected and protected, Ethiopia, Tanzania and Kenya, held a three day high level inter-governmental consultative conference which was expected to deliver a final comprehensive roadmap to address the situation of stranded migrants on the Southern route.

It was against the backdrop of this challenge that the three countries affected by the flux, namely The ‘Southern Route’ – as this migration route has become known – is reportedly used by scores of irregular migrants journeying southward in the hope of reaching South Africa.

A release from the International Organization for Migration has indicated that the consultation involved was held in partnership with both the International Organization for (IOM) and the European Union (EU). Running from Tuesday to Thursday, (April 2-4, 2019), the meeting takes place with the support of the EU-IOM Joint Initiative for Migrant Protection and Reintegration in the Horn of Africa. The programme, backed by the Africa Trust Fund, covers and has been set up in close cooperation with a total of other 23 African countries.

According to the IOM, the initiative is motivated by the desire to strike that delicate balance between managing the movement and ensuring appropriate human rights consideration in the treatment of the migrants. It follows several bilateral and trilateral technical meetings between the abovementioned countries, since 2014.

Technical experts from the three countries, with the support of IOM, were scheduled to develop a draft outcome document to be adopted by the states at senior political level on the third day, which was this past Friday.

In light of the above, chief of mission of the IOM in Tanzania, “Dr. Qasim Sufi, had expressed optimism that the donor community would continue to step forward to support efforts for the safe return and reintegration of vulnerable migrants.” He did in the same vein acknowledge the efforts of both the United Republic of Tanzania and Ethiopia to jointly assist migrants who are stranded in Kenya.

A key priority of the Joint Initiative, according to IOM, was to support partner countries in the region to develop capacities for safe, humane and dignified voluntary return as well as sustainable reintegration processes. In that regard, a roadmap aimed at addressing issues pertaining to the trafficking in persons and smuggling of migrants in the region, as well as the sharing of good practices and developing holistic approaches in tackling irregular migration on the Southern Route is reported to have been crafted at the consultation conference.

Other issues to be addressed by the proposed roadmap include considering alternatives to detention practices and exploring better coordination mechanisms to protect vulnerable migrants and as well improving existing voluntary return and reintegration processes and policies.

This publication made efforts to obtain comments from Wison Johwa, the IOM East Africa Regional communications officer regarding the outcomes of the EU-IOM sponsored Tri-nation initiative, which also linked me with both Alem Makonnen and Abbibo Ngandu, both based in Pretoria. The effort notwithstanding, hit a snag.

 

Source: Sunday Standard

An e-commerce platform, Jiji has announced the acquisition of OLX in Ghana and four other counties in Africa.

The details of the deal was made available via a statement by Naspers on Wednesday.

Consequently, OLX users in Ghana would be directed to Jiji marketplace in a transaction backed by one of Jiji’s cornerstone investors, Digital Spring Ventures.

According to the statement, both companies have also reached an agreement to acquire the other OLX businesses in Nigeria, Kenya, Tanzania, and Uganda, subject to regulatory approvals.

The statement noted that all users of the sell-and-buy classifieds websites of OLX Nigeria, OLX Ghana, OLX Kenya, OLX Tanzania, and OLX Uganda would be redirected to Jiji.

The Chief Executive Officer and co-founder of Jiji, Anton Volyansky, while making comment on the deal, said, “Users will always come first for us. We warmly welcome OLX’s customers to the Jiji family and we look forward to our new customers joining Jiji on its …online shopping experience.”

OLX shut down business in Nigeria last year February while it maintained its online marketplace as workers were laid off.

Tanzania says it plans to conclude talks in September with a group of foreign oil and gas companies led by Norway’s Equinor on developing a liquefied natural gas (LNG) project in the East African country.

Construction of an LNG export terminal near huge offshore natural gas discoveries in deepwater south of the country has been held up for years by regulatory delays.

“The government has officially decided to begin talks in early April for construction of the LNG project,” Tanzania’s energy ministry said in a statement issued late on Friday.

“We are keen to implement this key project for the economy and we plan to ... conclude the talks in September this year,” the ministry said. 

The country’s central bank believes just starting work on the plant would add another 2 percentage points to annual economic growth of around 7 percent. The talks are aimed at negotiating a host government agreement, which is seen as a crucial step towards reaching a final investment decision for the long-delayed project.

The decision to speed up the talks was reached following a meeting on Friday between the African country’s energy minister, Medard Kalemani, and Mette Ottøy, a senior vice president at Equinor, who is also the company’s country manager in Tanzania.

Equinor, alongside Royal Dutch Shell, Exxon Mobil and Ophir Energy, plan to build a $30 billion onshore LNG plant. The firms plan to develop the project in partnership with the state-run Tanzania Petroleum Development Corporation (TPDC).

Tanzania invited bids in April 2018 for consultancy services to help the government conclude negotiations for the host government agreement. Tanzania has estimated recoverable reserves of over 57 trillion cubic feet (tcf) of natural gas.

Tanzania President John Magufuli wants to speed up negotiations to set the commercial and fiscal framework for the LNG terminal development to boost revenues to finance other infrastructure projects.

 

- Reuters

Stiegler's Gorge Hydroelectric Power Station (SGHPS), which will be able to generate over 2,100MW.

Minister for Energy, Dr Medard Kalemani, told the Parliamentary Committee on Energy and Minerals, which visited the construction site recently, that 5,000 Tanzanians would be employed as temporary workers and 400 others would be employed under permanent contracts.

The parliamentary committee, which visited the construction site to assess mobilisation procedures, was led by its chairman, Mr Danstan Kitandula.

According to Mr Kalemani, between 3,000 and 5,000 Tanzanians will be employed during the construction, while between 250 and 400 others will get permanent employment after construction.

"Other 400 Tanzanians will be employed when the project starts to generate 2,225MW. This means they will be employed after construction," he noted.

He added: "Employment opportunities will help Tanzanians get income and improve their lives."

According to Dr Kalemani, the implementation of the project will uplift the livelihoods of Mloka villagers in Rufiji District in Cost Region and of Kisaki villagers in Morogoro Region.

He added that the project would enable the supply of electricity to 37 villages in Kibiti and Chalinze. A total of 12 villages will be connected to electricity under Tanzania Rural Energy Agency (REA) programme.

The government signed a construction agreement with Arab Contractors and Elsewedy Electric from Egypt in December 2018.

Speaking after the signing of the contract, Speaker of National Assembly Job Ndugai reaffirmed the Parliament's commitment to supporting the implementation of the hydropower project. Mr Ndugai praised the government for achieving what he described as a "historic landmark."

He added that: "As Parliament, we will support the initiative by allocating sufficient funds to make this project successful and useful."

The project is expected to cost 6.5tri/-. In October 4, 2018, Prime Minister Kassim Majaliwa visited the construction site and asked all Tanzanians and experts to play their roles effectively in ensuring proper implementation of the project.

In February, this year, the government handed over the site to the Egyptian contractor. The move paved the way for the contractor to officially start the job that will avail additional 2,100MW to the national grid.

 

Source: Daily News

Tanzanian President John Magufuli has given his newly appointed Minerals minister a 30-day ultimatum to install surveillance cameras round the tanzanite mines in northern Manyara region.

The President told Mr Dotto Biteko, who he promoted two weeks ago and is the third minister to head the docket since Magufuli’s election in 2015, to prepare to exit if he fails to do so.

In July 2017, President Magufuli ordered the military to construct a 24km perimeter wall surrounding the mines in Mirerani, Manyara to curb smuggling of the rare gemstone. He inaugurated the $2.2 million wall in April last year.

Mr Biteko was then the deputy minerals minister having been appointed to the position in January 2018.

"You need to be serious, the process doesn't even cost Tsh10 million (about $4,300), or else prepare, you and your deputy, to leave the office," he said during a meeting with mineral stakeholders in Dar es Salaam on Tuesday.

INCREASED REVENUES

The fencing off of the Mirerani mines has seen the country record increased revenues from the sales of tanzanite.

As at September last year, tanzanite revenues rose to Tsh1.28 billion ($461,000), from a low of Tsh166 million ($74,000) recorded in January 2015.

The growth is also attributed to stringent laws introduced in the mining industry in 2017 following allegations of rampant fraud and underreporting of production and exports in the sector.

The precious violet-blue stone is only found in Tanzania but the country is not the largest exporter of tanzanite.

THE Tanzanian government has signed agreements with owners of the cashew nut processing plants, who turned up for a processing exercise in the 2018/19 season.

Minister for Agriculture, Japhet Hasunga said on Tuesday that the government was looking forward to entering into agreements with various owners of plants, who were ready to process cashew nuts, which had been bought directly from farmers at 3,300/- Mr Hasunga was addressing reporters on the progress of the cashew nut business.

Recently, the government announced that the processing exercise would start soon. Moreover, the government has invited ordinary citizens to participate in the processing of cashew nuts through groups or as an individual.

"We also invite Tanzanians capable of processing cashew nuts. We ask them to go to Small Industries Development Organisation (SIDO) for registration," he said.

Mr Hasunga said until Tuesday 126 had already registered and 29 tonnes of cashew nuts had been taken for processing. The minister said apart from inviting private companies and individuals, the government was also working hard to revive its cashew nuts processing plants in the country.

Furthermore, the minister hailed President John Magufuli for witnessing the signing of a 21bn/- agreement between the National Food Reserve Authority (NFRA) and World Food Programme (WFP) signed recently. He said the intervention of WFP would boost maize price in the country and benefit more farmers.

 

Credit: Daily News

Issues related to tax and residence permits are frustrating Chinese investors interested in doing business in Tanzania, the Chinese ambassador, Ms Wang Ke, has said.

Ms Wang was speaking during a forum aimed at promoting investment and trade partnerships between Chinese and Tanzanian companies held in the city yesterday. It brought together 136 companies from Tanzania and 70 from China.

The envoy stressed the need for increasing efforts to improve the business environment in the country. The business community has repeatedly complained about overstated tax estimates and multiple taxes and absence of a one-stop centre that makes it convenient for foreign investors to register and apply for residence permit in one place.

"We understand that the government has noticed and attached great importance to this by taking measures to make improvements," she said.

According to the ambassador, China has increased its investments in the country, overtaking the UK as the number one source of investments in Tanzania. She said Chinese Investment volume has reached $7 billion in sectors that include energy and infrastructure and that Chinese companies were ready to invest in other areas including the cashew nut sub-sector.

For his part, Tanzania Private Sector Foundation (TPSF) Executive Director Godfrey Simbeye said it was important that the government worked to improve the business environment to attract more investors. "The government is trying but... it is discouraging that a Chinese investor producing tiles has to compete with fake products for markets," he said.

For his part, the Minister for Trade, Industry and Investment, Mr Joseph Kakunda, said the government has noted all the concerns raised by the ambassador and they were being addressed. He said the government was willing and ready to provide the required support.

He said the government has introduced an online portal where foreign companies can apply and register from their countries of origin before coming to Tanzania for final processes.

On trade between the two countries, the minister said: "We have been experiencing a huge trade imbalance by importing more of value added products and that is why we are looking for investors in agro processing, manufacturing and other vital sectors," he said.

He said the country produces 275,000 tonnes of cashew nuts annually and has the capacity to add value to 127,000 tonnes. However, he noted so far only 30,000 tonnes are processed for value addition.

Meanwhile, the Chairman of the China Council for Promoting South-South Cooperation Lyu Xinhua said they have launched an English website for international trade where different countries can reach partners for possible investments.

 

Credit: Citizen

A NEW commercial bank formed by China's state owned and private enterprises open doors in Dar es Salaam Monday next week to tap into growing Chinese trade and investment in Tanzania and boost use of Chinese currency, Yuan.

China Dasheng Bank Limited, a fully-fledged commercial bank will become the newest entrant in the Tanzania's banking sector and targets to support China funded projects in Tanzania and provide credit for individuals and enterprises doing business with China, according to the Board Chairman Ji Jiaqin.

He told reporters in Dar es Salaam that with initial capital of 40 million US dollars, the bank would also establish RMB clearing and settlement centre with a focus on the East African region to enable clients to trade directly in Renminbi, the official currency of China.

"There are a large number of Chinese enterprises in Tanzania, including government and private enterprises, he said at the meeting with media personnel.

"We have plans to actively participate in the construction of RMB clearing centre in East Africa, strive to become the RMB clearing/settlement centre in Tanzania and reduce the exchange losses in trading between the two currencies."

Chinese nationals are coming en-masse to Tanzania to do business and work on construction projects funded by the Chinese government and other private enterprises while Tanzanians have been making trips to the Asian country to purchase Chinese merchandise.

The Chairman said in Dar es Salaam yesterday that they provide all round financial services for all kinds of enterprises and individuals in Tanzania as well as enterprises and individuals who work with China.

The bank will provide all usual banking products such as demand, call and time deposit accounts, overdrafts, and loans in local currency and all major foreign currencies, he said.

Additional services to be made available to customers would include trade finance for both imports and exports including letters of credit, bill for collection, foreign exchange dealings and bank guarantees, he said.

Other services would include asset finance, insurance premium financing, treasury products, construction financing and syndicated loans. China is Tanzania's largest trading partner, with bilateral trade amounting to 3.88 billion U.S. dollars in 2 016 .

The Asian global economic powerhouse is also Tanzania's second-largest source of Foreign Direct Investment (FDI) and about 72 4 Chinese companies are registered with the Tanzania Investment Centre (TIC), according to Executive Director, Geoffrey Mwabe in an interview with X inhua.

Chinese investment in Tanzania has increased by more than 40 per cent in recent years, reaching $ 4 billion in 2016 , chief commercial representative at the Chinese embassy, Lin Zhiyong was quoted by media as saying.

 

Daily News

Reductions in malaria cases have stalled after several years of decline globally, according to the new World malaria report 2018

To get the reduction in malaria deaths and disease back on track, World Health Organisation, WHO and partners are joining a new country-led response, launched today, to scale up prevention and treatment, and increased investment, to protect vulnerable people from the deadly disease.

For the second consecutive year, the annual report produced by WHO reveals a plateauing in numbers of people affected by malaria: in 2017, there were an estimated 219 million cases of malaria, compared to 217 million the year before. But in the years prior, the number of people contracting malaria globally had been steadily falling, from 239 million in 2010 to 214 million in 2015.

“Nobody should die from malaria. But the world faces a new reality: as progress stagnates, we are at risk of squandering years of toil, investment and success in reducing the number of people suffering from the disease,” says Dr Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, WHO Director-General.

“We recognise we have to do something different – now. So today we are launching a country-focused and -led plan to take comprehensive action against malaria by making our work more effective where it counts most – at local level.”

Where malaria is hitting hardest

In 2017, approximately 70% of all malaria cases (151 million) and deaths (274 000) were concentrated in 11 countries: 10 in Africa (Burkina Faso, Cameroon, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ghana, Mali, Mozambique, Niger, Nigeria, Uganda and United Republic of Tanzania) and India. There were 3.5 million more malaria cases reported in these 10 African countries in 2017 compared to the previous year, while India, however, showed progress in reducing its disease burden.

Despite marginal increases in recent years in the distribution and use of insecticide-treated bed nets in sub-Saharan Africa – the primary tool for preventing malaria – the report highlights major coverage gaps. In 2017, an estimated half of at-risk people in Africa did not sleep under a treated net. Also, fewer homes are being protected by indoor residual spraying than before, and access to preventive therapies that protect pregnant women and children from malaria remains too low.

High impact response needed

In line with WHO’s strategic vision to scale up activities to protect people’s health, the new country-driven “High burden to high impact” response plan has been launched to support nations with most malaria cases and deaths. The response follows a call made by Dr Tedros at the World Health Assembly in May 2018 for an aggressive new approach to jump-start progress against malaria. It is based on four pillars:

  • Galvanizing national and global political attention to reduce malaria deaths;
  • Driving impact through the strategic use of information;
  • Establishing best global guidance, policies and strategies suitable for all malaria endemic countries; and
  • Implementing a coordinated country response.

Catalyzed by WHO and the RBM Partnership to End Malaria, “High burden to high impact” builds on the principle that no one should die from a disease that can be easily prevented and diagnosed, and that is entirely curable with available treatments.

“There is no standing still with malaria. The latest World malaria report shows that further progress is not inevitable and that business as usual is no longer an option,” said Dr Kesete Admasu, CEO of the RBM Partnership. “The new country-led response will jumpstart aggressive new malaria control efforts in the highest burden countries and will be crucial to get back on track with fighting one of the most pressing health challenges we face.”

Targets set by the WHO Global technical strategy for malaria 2016–2030 to reduce malaria case incidence and death rates by at least 40% by 2020 are not on track to being met.

Pockets of progress

The report highlights some positive progress. The number of countries nearing elimination continues to grow (46 in 2017 compared to 37 in 2010). Meanwhile in China and El Salvador, where malaria had long been endemic, no local transmission of malaria was reported in 2017, proof that intensive, country-led control efforts can succeed in reducing the risk people face from the disease.

In 2018, WHO certified Paraguay as malaria free, the first country in the Americas to receive this status in 45 years. Three other countries – Algeria, Argentina and Uzbekistan – have requested official malaria-free certification from WHO.

India – a country that represents 4% of the global malaria burden – recorded a 24% reduction in cases in 2017 compared to 2016. Also in Rwanda, 436 000 fewer cases were recorded in 2017 compared to 2016. Ethiopia and Pakistan both reported marked decreases of more than
240 000 in the same period.

“When countries prioritize action on malaria, we see the results in lives saved and cases reduced,” says Dr Matshidiso Moeti, WHO Regional Director for Africa. “WHO and global malaria control partners will continue striving to help governments, especially those with the highest burden, scale up the response to malaria.”

Domestic financing is key

As reductions in malaria cases and deaths slow, funding for the global response has also shown a levelling off, with US$ 3.1 billion made available for control and elimination programmes in 2017 including US$ 900 million (28%) from governments of malaria endemic countries.  The United States of America remains the largest single international donor, contributing US$ 1.2 billion (39%) in 2017.

To meet the 2030 targets of the global malaria strategy, malaria investments should reach at least US$6.6 billion annually by 2020 – more than double the amount available today.

 

Source: NAN

The government will provide free land to investors who would be interested in establishing industries involved in making building and construction materials, a cabinet minister has revealed.

Opening the 21st Buldexpo yesterday, the minister for Lands, Housing and Human Settlements Development, Mr Wlliam Lukuvi, told the business community that the offer will last until December, aiming at attracting more investors in the building and construction sector and reducing imports.

Buldexpo is Africa's building and construction tradeshow whose 21st edition is currently going on in the country for three days. It comprises more than 200 manufacturers and exporters from around the world, covering a variety of sectors in construction, ranging from building and construction materials, aluminum steel profiles, granite, ceramics and pipe fittings to mining tools and hardware.

So far, at least 800 plots have been set aside at Kibaha area, according to him, but the offer is for the whole country.

"I am happy that you (exhibitors) are here to showcase your modern construction materials, but I wish you could install plants for manufacturing them locally instead of importing them," he told the exhibitors. To ease the process, Mr Lukuvi has announced the government would provide them with land free of charge.

"Whoever is interested should come to my office from tomorrow (31st October) and I will give you a well surveyed piece of land," he said, adding that although the offer targeted manufacturers of construction and building materials, investors in other sectors would also benefit from the offer.

The minister also promised to assist investors to communicate with other ministries and regulatory bodies related to industrial investments, for further procedures.

"I know some of you have not tried the Tanzanian market before, but I assure you that you will not regret investing here. No company has operated at a loss in this country as the market is huge and the business environment is conducive," he noted, reiterating the available opportunities in constructing affordable houses.

"We currently demand at least 50,000 housing units for public workers and other individuals. The government cannot afford to build them alone and seeks your (private sector) support," he said.

He urged them to either build the houses on their own or collaborate with local companies.

Kenyan ambassador to Tanzania Dan Kazungu echoed Mr Lukuvi's call, saying that the investments would also benefit Kenya and other East African countries.

"We (EAC) have common market agreements that encourage countries to do business with each other. So, constructing these industries in Tanzania will help you to access the Kenyan and other EAC countries' markets," he said.

 

Credit: Citizen

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