Items filtered by date: Saturday, 20 July 2019
Saturday, 20 July 2019 15:01

Nigeria: NPA appoints new GMs, AGMs

The Nigerian Ports Authority (NPA) has announced a major management change with the appointment new General Managers (GMs) and Assistant General Managers (AGMs) to inject new ideas into the organisation and boost service delivery.
 
The General Manager, Corporate and Strategic Communications, Mr Adams Jatto, made this known in a statement issued in Lagos on Friday.
 
According to him, this exercise is coming on the heels of an ealier appointment and redeployment of port managers and other senior officials.
 
“With this development Hajia Aisha Ali Ibrahim now becomes the GM Marine and Operations; Capt. Jerome Angyunwe – GM Health, Safety and Environment; Malam Isah Suwaid Ali – GM Superannuation; Mr Musa Yaro – GM Procurement, and Mr Mohammed Kabiru Kolo- GM Audit.
 
“Others include Mr Olumide Omotosho – GM Security; Mr Sylvanus Ezugwu – GM Finance; Mrs Nana Yakubu – GM Public-Private Partnership; Mrs Christiana Akpa – GM Medicals, and Mr Innocent Gamboro – GM Corporate and strategic Planing.
 
“In the Assistant General Managers cadre Ayodele Durowaiye becomes AGM Operations; Mrs Zainab Kwande – AGM Servicom; Mr Hassan Danjuma – AGM Corporate and Strategic Communications; Mr Talum Amos – AGM Hydrographic; Mr Jamil Khalil – AGM Security; Engr. Suleiman Anas – AGM Corporate and strategic Planning, and Mr Shehu Mohammed – AGM Public and Private Partnership.
 
“Others of AGM cadre are Chuma Ezeneinyinya – AGM Occupational Health; Dr Chinwe Nwokolo – AGM Medical Services; Capt. Sylvester Owobu – AGM Marine; Izegboya Ethel – AGM Board; Felix Onyile – AGM Human Resources; Mr Sani Isu – AGM Land and Estate,” the statement read in part.
 
According to Jatto other AGM appointees included; Tokunbo Akingbuwa – AGM Budget; Olusola Dairo – AGM Performance Management; Akinlabi Illesanmi – AGM Civil, and Mrs Lucy Gukas – AGM Tariff and Billing.
 
He said that the appointments were tandem with the succession plan policy set up by the Managing Director of NPA, Ms Hadiza Bala-Usman-led management, to fill leadership gaps that had arisen in the wake of the retirement of some senior officials of the authority.
 
The appointment of the new officials would further refresh the composition of the organisation’s leadership structure and inject new ideas that would move the NPA ahead in pursuit of her vision of becoming the leading port authority in Africa.
Published in Business
The British-flagged tanker Stena Impero was in an accident with a fishing boat before being detained on Friday, Iran’s Fars news agency reported on Saturday, quoting an official.
 
Iran says all 23 crew seized on the tanker are now at Bandar Abbas port and will remain on the vessel until the end of an investigation, according to Fars.
 
“It got involved in an accident with an Iranian fishing boat… When the boat sent a distress call, the British-flagged ship ignored it,” said the head of Ports and Maritime Organisation in southern Hormozgan province, Allahmorad Afifipour.
 
“The tanker is now at Iran’s Bandar Abbas port and all of its 23 crew members will remain on the ship until the probe is over.”
 
Britain said earlier it was urgently seeking information about the Stena Impero, which had been heading to a port in Saudi Arabia and suddenly changed course after passing through the strait at the mouth of the Gulf.
Published in World
The Desert Foxes of Algeria have won the 2019 African Cup of Nations, AFCON, tournament in Egypt after beating Senegal 1-0 on Friday.
 
It was Algeria’s second time of winning the AFCON after 29 years.
 
Algeria opened scoring through Baghdad Bounedjah on 2nd minute. He tried his luck from the edge of the box and his shot took a deflection and went past the stranded Alfred Gomis.
 
On 38 minutes, there was a penalty appeal after M’Baye Niang of Senegal went down under a challenge from the defender. All players chased the referee but he was not interested in the penalty claim.
 
Few seconds later, Niang wasted a big chance to draw Senegal level. He unleashed a shot from the edge of the box and it went narrowly over the crossbar.
 
On 60th minute, Adlene Guedioura of Algeria handled the ball and the referee awarded a penalty, but he was called by the Video Assistant Referee, VAR to take a second look.
 
Referee Neant Alioum came back after watching a replay and quickly reversed his decision to award a penalty after a VAR review.
 
Niang had chance to draw level for Senegal on 66th minute as he picked up an inch-perfect pass inside the box and fired the ball just over the crossbar.
 
On 69th minute, a good pass found Youssouf Sabaly on the edge of the box, and he drilled the ball towards the roof of the net. Rais M’Bolhi was almost caught out but pulled off a brilliant save at the last second.
 
With 68 percent ball possession, Senegal could not dent the Algeria’s defence. The Senegalese also had 11 goal attempts while Algeria had one. While the Algerian keeper saved three clear goals attempt, the Senegalese keeper had no save.
Published in World
King Salman bin Abdulaziz of Saudi Arabia, has approved hosting of the U.S. armed forces in the kingdom, Saudi Press Agency reported on Saturday.
 
An official in the Saudi Ministry of Defence clarified that the decision was made based on the principles of strengthening regional security and stability, and joint cooperation between the two countries.
 
He further highlighted that the hosting would increase joint cooperation in defending regional security and preserve peace.
 
The tension in the Gulf region is escalating along with U.S.-Iran conflicts about Iran’s nuclear activities.
 
The Trump administration reinforced its controversial military relationship with Saudi Arabia when it proposed sending hundreds of troops to the country amid increasing tensions with Iran.
 
U.S. defence officials had earlier disclosed that 500 troops were to be deployed to the Prince Sultan Air Base, located in a desert area, east of Riyadh.
 
The U.S. wanted to base its troops in the area because security assessments had shown Iranian missiles would have a difficult time targeting the remote area, NAN reported.
Published in World

Ghana has been chosen by the African Union (AU) to host the secretariat of the African Continental Free Trade Area. It beat other competing countries including Egypt, Eswatini, Ethiopia, Kenya, Madagascar and Senegal to win the bid.

As a free trade area, member countries have come together and agreed not to impose tariffs, quotas and other trade barriers on goods and services. The agreement is expected to enlarge markets and diversify exports, particularly manufactured goods. According to US-based think tank the Brookings Institute, intra-African trade stands at about 14%, while the share of manufactured goods to the rest of the world stands at 18%. Trade among Asian countries is much higher – at 59% – and even higher among European countries at 69%. The hope is that the African free trade area will boost trade across the continent by 52% by 2022 .

The core mandate of the secretariat will be to implement the free trade agreement, which has been ratified by 25 out of 54 countries. Once all have ratified the deal, it will create the world’s largest free trade area since the formation of the World Trade Organisation in 1995.

Africa’s free trade area will cover a market of 1.2 billion people with a combined Gross Domestic Product (GDP) of US$2.5 trillion.

The secretariat’s job will be to recruit personnel, train them, and develop organisational capability. The secretariat will also have to implement policies handed down by the governing body, keep the media informed, organise conferences and identify potential funding sources. It will also monitor and evaluate the progress of policies and programmes.

This is a first for Ghana which has not hosted a continental secretariat. The hope is that it can emulate the success of other African capitals that have befitted from hosting the AU and the United Nations. Addis Ababa is home to the AU headquarters while Nairobi hosts two of the UN’s biggest bodies. For its part, South Africa hosts the Pan-African Parliament.

The presence of the AU in Addis Ababa has been credited with an increase in property valuations as well as job creation.

In making its bid, Ghana took advantage of its strategic geographical location in West Africa. It has put a great deal of effort into making the country a gateway and a trade hub in West Africa.

Hosting the free trade area secretariat will come with costs and benefits - direct and indirect.

Why Ghana

In establishing its credentials to host the secretariat, the Ghanaian government would have set out the country’s most notable achievements.

These would have included the fact that it’s been an exemplary member of the AU. For example, in 2007 it was among the first countries to be reviewed by the African Peer Review Mechanism – the self-assessment mechanism used to measure good governance.

The fact that it put its hand up sent a signal to other countries that the peer review process was credible.

Other factors that would have played in Ghana’s favour are that the country’s economy has been showing strong growth.

It is one of the fastest growing economies in the world with an average GDP growth of about 6%. In addition, it comes second to Cape Verde in West Africa in terms of the United Nations Human Development index.

In one of the most unstable sub regions in the world, Ghana also has a tradition of relative peace and security, a key parameter for hosting a secretariat.

In addition, Ghana has had the advantage of learning about trade collaboration through its membership of the Economic Community of West African States (Ecowas).

Costs and benefits

Ghana has been part of the 15-member Ecowas since its formation in 1990. The regional body introduced a common external tariff in 2015 .

While Ghana has enjoyed benefits from the arrangement, like many other West African States, it has not been able to harness its full potential. For example, border controls remain cumbersome, delaying transits due to the numerous check points, huge unofficial payments at the borders.

The most direct cost to the country will be the $10 million pledged by President Nana Addo Dankwa Akufo-Addo to support setting up the secretariat. The AU is also expected to contribute funds and appeals have been made to international funding agencies.

Ghana’s hope is that hosting the secretariat will boost the hospitality sector – and more broadly the services sector – and generate increased international exposure.

There should also be a boost for job creation as the secretariat hires staff; ranging from economists to translators, administrators and technicians.

There is no clear deadline on when the secretariat is expected to be up and running. The AU itself still has to clear a number of hurdles,, including adopting a structure, staff rules and regulations, and the secretariat’s budget.The Conversation

 

Adu Owusu Sarkodie, Doctor of Economics, University of Ghana

This article is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article.

Published in Economy
  1. Opinions and Analysis

Calender

« July 2019 »
Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat Sun
1 2 3 4 5 6 7
8 9 10 11 12 13 14
15 16 17 18 19 20 21
22 23 24 25 26 27 28
29 30 31